Flower Guide

Initially this guide displays common flowers of all colors that are blooming right now in our area. Use the selectors to view rare species, to view flowers blooming any time, to restrict the output to a certain color, or to search by name.

The Jemez Mountain Herbarium located at PEEC has a specimen collection of over 1,000 plant species that are found in the Jemez Mountain region. This guide was developed as a subset of this collection to help in the identification of the most prevalent flowering plants in Los Alamos County. Most of the plants shown here are native to the area, though a few were introduced to the region.

Monocot and both simple and composite flowering dicots are covered in this guide. This information is included in each description and potentially makes it easier to identify the different plants.

  • monocot – seed has 1 embryonic leaf; flower parts com in multiples of 3; leaves have parallel veins
  • dicot – seed has 1 embryonic leaves; flower parts com in multiples of 4 or 5; leaves have scattered veins
  • simple flower – single, symmetric flowers; usually 3 to 6 petals that emerge from the flower center
  • composite flower – multiple, tiny flowers arranged on a single base, typically rays around a disc; each tiny flower has its own seed

Most of the plants represented here are classified as forb/herb which are plants without significant woody growth. However, some flowering shrubs and trees have been included. Many of the later can also be found in the PEEC Tree Guide. This guide does not include any noxious weeds from the area. These are covered in the PEEC Invasive Plant Guide.

You can get additional information on local blooms by joining PEEC Wild Plants.  More detailed descriptions can be found in Plants of the Jemez Mountains Volumes 2 and 3, which are available in the PEEC gift shop.

Flower References

American Southwest Plants
Annotated Checklist and Database for Vascular Plants of the Jemez Mountains
Colorado Rocky Mountain Wildflowers
Flora of North America
Foxx, T., Martin, C., and Hoard, D., 2018 Plants of the Jemez Mountains Volume 2: Wildflowers: Showy Monocots and Common Dicots.
Foxx, T., Martin, C., and Hoard, D., 2019 Plants of the Jemez Mountains Volume 3: Composites.
eNature
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
National Garden Association
Native Plants Society of New Mexico
New Mexico Flora
Rocky Mountain Flora
Southwest Desert Flora
Wildflowers of the United States
US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Services
US Forest Service

Subject Area Experts (all guides)

Steve Cary (butterflies)
Beth Cortright (insects)
Terry Foxx (invasive plants)
Leslie Hansen (mammals)
Richard Hansen (fish, mammals)
Dorothy Hoard (butterflies, trees)
Chick Keller (flowers, herbarium)
Shari Kelley (geology)
Kirt Kempter (geology)
Garth Tietjen (reptiles)
David Yeamans (birds)

Web Development and Content Management

Pat Bacha
Jennifer Macke
Graham Mark
Akkana Peck

Contact

Please contact us for local nature questions and sightings. We welcome comments, corrections, and additions to our guides.

For more information about local nature, please visit our Nature Blog or subscribe to PEEC This Week.

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Showing 29 of 179 flowers.
Running Fleabane

Photo: Chick Keller

Running Fleabane

Photo: Dan Beckman

Running Fleabane, Running Daisy, Tracy's Fleabane

ERCO28 (Erigeron tracyi, Erigeron colomexicanus )

Family: Asteraceae (Daisies)
Size: 6 - 12 in (15 - 30 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; biennial
Blooms: Feb 01 - Dec 01

Flower: composite; white with yellow center, may have purple color on edges; a single flowerhead per stem made up of 100 ray florets and over 200 disc florets
Leaf: dicot; basal leaves close together and wider toward the tip; stem leaves few and narrow; hairy
Fruit: archenes topped with bristles

Status: native; common
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- foothills, open areas, and woods
Typical location: Red Dot Trail

Spreads via runners during summer and fall. Similar in overall appearance to Spreading Fleabane but has runner similar to Whiplash Daisy.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
New Mexico Groundsel

Photo: Chick Keller

New Mexico Groundsel

Photo: Dan Beckman

New Mexico Groundsel

PANEN (Packera neomexicana, Senecio neomexicanus)

Family: Asteraceae (Daisies)
Size: 12 - 24 in (30 - 61 cm)
Growth: forb/herb, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Mar 09 - Jul 10

Flower: composite; yellow; 5 to 14 ray florets around 40 or more disc florets; clusters of between 3 and 20 flowerheads
Leaf: dicot; wider at the tip than base; may have teeth and hairs; mostly located around the base
Fruit: white puffs of hairs attached to seeds similar to dandelions

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- foothills, montane, subalpine, woodlands, openings
Typical location: Perimeter Trail to Water Canyon

Plants are often crowded together with an unusual abundance of flowers for each plant. Plants can often be fairly variable.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Wooton's Ragwort

Photo: Chick Keller

Wooton's Ragwort

Photo: Craig Martin

Wooton's Ragwort, Wooton's Senecio

SEWO (Senecio wootonii)

Family: Asteraceae (Daisies)
Size: up to 24 in (61 cm)
Growth: forb/herb, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Apr 01 - Jun 18

Flower: composite; yellow; on stems with few leaves terminating in a flowerhead; one long petal per flowerhead
Leaf: dicot; have small teeth and long stalks with wings
Fruit: achenes, ribbed and hairless

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- montane, woodlands, openings
Typical location: Quemazon Trail

When flower buds first appear they seem to only have disk flowers but the ray flowers appear with time. Plants in full sun bear a large number of flowers.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Perkysue

Photo: Chick Keller

Perkysue

Photo: Craig Martin

Perkysue, Perky Sue

TEAR4 (Tetraneuris argentea, Hymenoxys argentea )

Family: Asteraceae (Daisies)
Size: up to 15 in (38 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Apr 01 - Aug 15

Flower: composite; yellow; found on the top of long leafless stalks; a dozen or so notched ray florets stick out very straight from the central disc florets
Leaf: dicot; fuzzy silver leaves
Fruit: achenes topped with scales

Status: native; common
Habitat: pinyon-juniper, ponderosa --- niches in solid rock areas
Typical location: Lower Quemazon Trail

Hearty plant that is the earliest blooming yellow daisy. Has been used heartburn and in a lotion for eczema.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Stemless Townsend Daisy

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Stemless Townsend Daisy

Photo: Chick Keller

Stemless Townsend Daisy

Photo: Craig Martin

Stemless Townsend Daisy, Easter Daisy, Silky Townsend Daisy

TOEX2 (Townsendia exscapa)

Family: Asteraceae (Daisies)
Size: 1 - 7 in (3 - 18 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Mar 10 - May 19

Flower: composite; white to pinkish petals surrounding a yellow center
Leaf: dicot; gray-green; spatulate in shape; usually hairy
Fruit: achene with fine, slender bristles on top

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- grasslands, sage; plains, valleys
Typical location: Burnt Mesa Trail

Plant grows from a woody taproot from which the leaves and flowers grow directly. Thus, the plant is stemless or nearly so.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Creeping Barberry

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Creeping Barberry

Photo: Craig Martin

Creeping Barberry

Photo: freejinn

Creeping Barberry, Creeping Oregon Grape

MARE11 (Mahonia repens)

Family: Berberidaceae (Barberries)
Size: 12 - 24 in (30 - 61 cm)
Growth: shrub, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Mar 15 - May 30

Flower: simple; yellow; long clusters of up to 50 flowers; 6 petals
Leaf: dicot; bluish green with some leaves in pinks and oranges
Fruit: matte blue berries

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- foothills, montane, subalpine, woodlands
Typical location: Satch Cowan Trail

A sprawling evergreen with small fragrant flowers. The berries attract birds. In the fall the leaves of this groundcover turn bronze.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
James' Cryptantha

Photo: Chick Keller

James' Cryptantha

Photo: Craig Martin

James' Cryptantha, James' Hiddenflower, James' Catseye

CRCIJ (Cryptantha cinerea, Oreocarya suffruticosa)

Family: Boraginaceae (Borages)
Size: up to 4 in (10 cm)
Growth: forb/herb, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Apr 15 - Sep 10

Flower: simple; white with yellow corolla tube; dozen of clusters per plant that elongate with age
Leaf: dicot; narrow, linear leaves; sparse hairs
Fruit: four identical smooth nutlets

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: pinyon-juniper, ponderosa --- open areas, semi-desert
Typical location: Anniversary Trail

One of the most shrub-like of the genus with many branches and bristly hairs. Found in open areas below 8,000 ft (2,400 m).

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Thicksepal Catseye

Photo: Craig Martin

Thicksepal Catseye

Photo: J.N. Stuart

Thicksepal Catseye

Photo: Andrey Zharkikh

Thicksepal Catseye, Thicksepal Cryptantha, Thicksepal Hiddenflower

CRCR3 (Cryptantha crassisepala)

Family: Boraginaceae (Borages)
Size: up to 4 in (10 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual
Blooms: Apr 01 - May 31

Flower: simple; tiny; white with a little yellow; 5 petals
Leaf: dicot; oblanceolate;hairy; form a rosette about an inch across
Fruit: 4 nutlets, one taller than the others

Status: native; common
Habitat: scrubland --- sandy soils in semi-desert

Used by Navajo as a lotion for itching and muscle fatigue.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Flatspine Stickseed

Photo: Marion Stelts

Flatspine Stickseed

Photo: Craig Martin

Flatspine Stickseed

Photo: Ellen Hildebrandt

Flatspine Stickseed, Flatspine Sheepburr, Western Sticktight

LAOC3 (Lappula occidentalis)

Family: Boraginaceae (Borages)
Size: up to 32 in (81 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, biennial
Blooms: Apr 15 - May 30

Flower: simple; light blue to white; small and hairy; radially symmetrical; 5 petals
Leaf: dicot; lance-shaped with pointed end at the bottom; alternate arrangement; hairy
Fruit: star-shaped nutlets

Status: native; common
Habitat: disturbed soil, ponderosa --- semi-desert, foothills, montane, open areas
Typical location: Lower Pueblo Canyon

The seedpods are easily carried away by animals and humans brushing against the plant. The Navajo used the plant in a poultice for insect bites and other skin irritations. Usually found below 8,500 ft (2,500 m).

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Fendler's Rockcress

Photo: Chick Keller

Fendler's Rockcress

Photo: Craig Martin

false flowers

Photo: false flowers by Christina M. Selby

Fendler's Rockcress

ARFEF (Boechera fendleri, Arabis fendleri)

Family: Brassicaceae (Mustards)
Size: up to 4 in (10 cm)
Growth: forb/herb, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Mar 30 - May 27

Flower: simple; white, turning pink to purple with age; 4 petals
Leaf: dicot; basal leaves broadly oblanceolate with forked hairs; upper leaves smooth
Fruit: pedicels; horizontal or curving downward

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- rocky slopes in pine forests, pinyon-juniper woodlands, scrub oak

This is tall, slender plants that is often attacked by a rust fungus (see bottom photo). The fungal hyphae germinate and then parasitize nutrients from the host plant. The fungus causes the plant to produce both a scent and nectar to attract insects that then carry the fungus spores to another plant.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Crossflower

Photo: Rebecca Shankland

Crossflower

Photo: J.N. Stuart

Crossflower, Blue Mustard, Purple Mustard

CHTE2 (Chorispora tenella)

Family: Brassicaceae (Mustards)
Size: 6 - 24 in (15 - 61 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual
Blooms: Mar 24 - Jun 19

Flower: simple; blue to purple; 4 petals; borne on racemes
Leaf: dicot; grey-green; wavy-edged with teeth
Fruit: long pods that curve upward; reddish brown seeds

Status: naturalized plant; locally common
Habitat: disturbed soil --- semi-deserts, foothills, fields, woodlands
Typical location: White Rock

This plant originated in Europe and Asia but was introduced in the US long ago. It is classified as a noxious weed in many areas due to its ability to take over open fields in the early spring. Has a strong musky odor.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Sanddune Wallflower

Photo: Mike Anderson

Sanddune Wallflower

Photo: Chick Keller

Sanddune Wallflower

Photo: Dan Rideout

Sanddune Wallflower, Western Wallflower, Wallflower, Prairie Rocket

ERCA14 (Erysimum capitatum)

Family: Brassicaceae (Mustards)
Size: 12 - 24 in (30 - 61 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; biennial, perennial
Blooms: Apr 15 - Jul 12

Flower: simple; yellow though may show as orange in some areas;4 flat petals; dense, rounded flower cluster on the top of the plant
Leaf: dicot; long, thin leaves; rosette at the bottom of the plant;
Fruit: narrow and nearly vertical seed pods

Status: native; locally common
Habitat: mixed conifer --- semi-desert to alpine, woodlands, meadows

A highly variable species, often one of the first flowers in spring. The plant grows in a small group, often scattered over a large area.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Fendler's Pennycress

Photo: Craig Martin

Fendler's Pennycress

Photo: Alex Abair

Fendler's Pennycress, Alpine Pennycrest, Wild Candytuft

NOMOF (Noccaea fendleri)

Family: Brassicaceae (Mustards)

Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Mar 15 - May 14

Flower: simple; white with a little pink; flowers grow in dense clusters
Leaf: dicot; small, arrow-shaped leaves; evenly spaced and growing on the main stem of the plant
Fruit: two fused carpels with two seeds in each half

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: mixed conifer --- lower montane through alpine, woodlands, openings, meadows
Typical location: Valle Canyon

Grows in large patches with few other plants around. It starts to flower when still close to the ground but the continues to elongate as it grows.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Spinystar

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Spinystar

Photo: Akkana Peck

Spinystar, Pincushion Cactus, Beehive Cactus

ESVI2 (Escobaria vivipara, Coryphantha vivapara)

Family: Cactaceae (Cacti)
Size: up to 6 in (15 cm)
Growth: shrub; perennial
Blooms: Apr 15 - Jun 15

Flower: simple; pink; arise from tubercles at the top of the plant; conspicuously fringed
Leaf: dicot; up to 40 white radial spines and several darker, central spines pointing outwards at various angles
Fruit: green, ovoid fruits that turn dull brownish red; juicy

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- dry valleys, foothills, grasslands

A favorite as an ornamental in nurseries, this cactus can be found at elevations up to 8,800 ft (2,700 m) as a single plant or small cluster of 20 or more stems. It was a common food source, roasted or boiled, for some Native American cultures.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Arizona Valerian

Photo: Chick Keller

Arizona Valerian

Photo: Craig Martin

Arizona Valerian, Valerian

VAAR3 (Valeriana arizonica)

Family: Caprifoliaceae (Honeysuckles)
Size: 2 - 6 in (5 - 15 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Mar 19 - Jun 01

Flower: simple; pinkish white; tubular; arranged in a spherical cluster; 5 lobes
Leaf: dicot; sparsely spaced leaves; opposite arrangement
Fruit: achene-like with 1 seed

Status: native; locally common
Habitat: mixed conifer, ponderosa --- moist coniferous forests
Typical location: Valle Canyon

Found at upper elevations on north facing slopes. The plant is characterized by unbranched, stout but relatively short stems tapering to long stalks.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Kinnikinnick

Photo: Chick Keller

Kinnikinnick

Photo: Lorraine Briddon

Kinnikinnick

Photo: Don Sutherland

Kinnikinnick, Bearberry

ARUV (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi)

Family: Ericaceae (Heaths)
Size: 2 - 12 in (5 - 30 cm)
Growth: shrub; perennial
Blooms: Mar 10 - May 08

Flower: simple; paink and white; urn-shaped on bright-red stems
Leaf: dicot; shiny and small; thick, leathery, and paddle-shaped
Fruit: drupes; bright red and glossy

Status: native; locally common
Habitat: ponderosa --- montane, alpine, woodlands
Typical location: Kinnikinnick Park

Its species name of uva-ursi means "grape of the bear” and indeed bears eats the fruit. Often forms very dense, pure stands of groundcover.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Mountain Goldenbanner

Photo: Josip Loncaric

Mountain Goldenbanner

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Mountain Goldenbanner, Golden Pea, Montane Goldenbanner, Buckbean

THMO6 (Thermopsis montana, Thermopsis rhombifolia)

Family: Fabaceae (Peas)
Size: 1 - 4 in (3 - 10 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Apr 14 - Jun 11

Flower: simple; yellow; held on a spike above leaves in elongated clusters
Leaf: dicot; 3 long, oval leaflets arranged on a stem compound
Fruit: long, brown upright pod which dries to black

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- semi-desert, foothills, woodlands, meadows, open areas

The plant has purplish stems with a white coating. The flowers which are particularly attractive to bumblebees have been used as a source of yellow dye.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Redstem Stork's Bill

Photo: Craig Martin

Redstem Stork's Bill

Photo: Craig Martin

Redstem Stork's Bill

Photo: Craig Martin

Redstem Stork's Bill, Redstem Filaree, Pinweed, Cranesbill

ERCI6 (Erodium cicutarium)

Family: Geraniacea (Geraniums)
Size: 6 - 12 in (15 - 30 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, biennial
Blooms: Jan 02 - Dec 30

Flower: simple; pink, often with dark spots; arranged in loose clusters with 10 filaments
Leaf: dicot; deeply cleft; fern-like
Fruit: long, narrow, pointed seed pods

Status: naturalized plant; common
Habitat: disturbed soil --- desert scrub, grasslands, oak woodlands, semi-desert grassland, lawns, gardens; more common at lower elevations

It was introduced into California from the Mediterranean Basin in the eighteenth century. The entire plant is edible and resembles a parsley when picked young. It is considered to be a weed in some areas.

Info    Photos   Distribution   Weed Guide
Wax Currant

Photo: Ellen Hildebrandt

Wax Currant

Photo: Craig Martin

Wax Currant

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Wax Currant, Western Red Currant, White Squaw Currant

RICE (Ribes cereum)

Family: Grossulariaceae (Currants)
Size: 8 - 80 in (20 - 203 cm)
Growth: shrub; perennial
Blooms: Apr 01 - May 30

Flower: simple; pink and white; bell-shaped; clusters with 2 to 9 flowers
Leaf: dicot; light-green foliage; turns yellow in autumn
Fruit: bright-red berries with dried flower remnant at the end

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- grows in mountain forests, sagebrush, woodlands

Compact, rounded shrub with cherry-like bark. The plant is aromatic, with a "spicy" scent. The berries are edible but considered to be fairly tasteless.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Plains Flax

Photo: wingedchimera

Plains Flax

Photo: Peter Alexander

Plains Flax

LIPU4 (Linum puberulum, Cathartolinum puberulum)

Family: Linaceae (Flax)
Size: up to 2 in (5 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual
Blooms: Apr 14 - May 14

Flower: simple; orange with red center; open flower with five petals
Leaf: dicot; greenish-gray; very narrow, almost grasslike
Fruit: ovoid capsule that splits into 5 parts on maturation

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: ponderosa --- semi-desert, foothills, openings, meadows
Typical location: Overlook Park, White Rock Canyon

Plant most often seen along canyon rims, often growing is sparse patches. The flower petals are so loosely attached that the least amount of movement can cause them to fall off. Native Americans have used the plant to treat eye inflammation.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Tufted Evening Primrose

Photo: Craig Martin

Tufted Evening Primrose

Photo: Barbara Calef

Tufted Evening Primrose, Fragarent Evening Primrose, Gumbo Evening Primrose

OECA10 (Oenothera caespitosa)

Family: Onagraceae (Evening Primroses)
Size: up to 8 in (20 cm)
Growth: forb/herb, subshrub; perennial
Blooms: Mar 27 - Jul 17

Flower: simple; white; 4 petals that are deeply notched at tip; flowers become pink as they age
Leaf: dicot; long, thin, lobed leaves; irregularly lobed or toothed
Fruit: rough seedpods; inconspicuous

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- foothills, montane, woodlands, openings
Typical location: Anniversary Trail

Spreads by underground roots and often forms large colonies. Flowers open with the evening and wither to pink by the next afternoon. Dependent on hawkmoths for pollination.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Scrambled Eggs

Photo: Rebecca Shankland

Scrambled Eggs

Photo: Craig Martin

Scrambled Eggs

Photo: Craig Martin

Scrambled Eggs, Golden Smoke, Golden Corydalis

COAU2 (Corydalis aurea)

Family: Papaveraceae (Poppies)
Size: up to 18 in (46 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, biennial
Blooms: Apr 01 - Aug 18

Flower: simple; yellow; spur at the back of each flower; form tightly packed clusters with up to 30 flowers
Leaf: dicot; blue-green leaves divided into leaflets with oval or diamond lobes
Fruit: cylindrical capsules; curve upward

Status: native; common
Habitat: mixed conifer, pinyon-juniper, ponderosa --- montane, subalpine, woodlands
Typical location: Valle Canyon

Often mistaken for a pea rather than a poppy. The stems are weak and are often supported by vegetation or rocks.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Pygmyflower Rockjasmine

Photo: Craig Martin

Pygmyflower Rockjasmine

Photo: Craig Martin

Pygmyflower Rockjasmine

Photo: Christina M. Selby

Pygmyflower Rockjasmine, Rock Jasmine, RockJasmine, Northern Fairy Candelabra

ANSE4 (Androsace septentrionalis)

Family: Primulaceae (Primroses)
Size: 6 - 10 in (15 - 25 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, perennial
Blooms: Mar 19 - Sep 01

Flower: simple; white with yellow center; enclosed by a green or reddish calyx; 5 petals
Leaf: dicot; simple leaves formed in a rosette
Fruit: small, smooth, round capsule containing about 20 seeds

Status: native; common
Habitat: mixed conifer, ponderosa --- foothills, montane, subalpine, meadows, open woods

Tiny plant often obscured by others. It turns shades of red shortly after finishing blooming. Can be found up to 11,000 ft (3,400 m).

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Rock Clematis

Photo: Damian Tighe

Rock Clematis

Photo: Craig Martin

Rock Clematis

Photo: Craig Martin

Rock Clematis, Spring Clematis

CLCO2 (Clematis columbiana)

Family: Ranunculaceae (Buttercups)
Size: 5 - 7 in (13 - 18 cm)
Growth: vine; perennial
Blooms: Apr 05 - May 22

Flower: simple; purple to white; hairy with prominent veins and pointed sepals; flowers often point downward
Leaf: dicot; oval to heart-shaped; trifolate
Fruit: plumed seed heads

Status: native; uncommon
Habitat: mixed conifer, ponderosa --- foothills, montane, woodlands
Typical location: Pajarito Trail

This is a spring-blooming vine that is usually not noticeable from the trail, preferring deep forest shade. The stems climb along the ground and up over low bushes and tree trunks.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Eastern Pasqueflower

Photo: Christina M. Selby

Eastern Pasqueflower

Photo: Chick Keller

Eastern Pasqueflower

Photo: Chick Keller

Eastern Pasqueflower, American Pasqueflower

PUPA5 (Pulsatilla patens, Anemone patens)

Family: Ranunculaceae (Buttercups)
Size: 3 - 18 in (8 - 46 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Mar 16 - Jun 19

Flower: simple; blue, purple and/or white; single cup-shaped flower on each stalk; 6 petals
Leaf: dicot; deeply cut basal leaves; 3 unstalked leaves with linear segments surround each flower
Fruit: feathery, silky fruiting head

Status: native; common
Habitat: ponderosa --- dry, open, and rocky low to high montane forests and meadows
Typical location: Pajarito Trail, Perimeter Trail, Rendija Canyon

Plants often occur in large colonies. They elongate as they mature. Although the plant was used by Native Americans as a medicine it is highly toxic.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Alderleaf Mountain Mahogany

Photo: Jess Demoss

Alderleaf Mountain Mahogany

Photo: Chick Keller

Alderleaf Mountain Mahogany

Photo: Mary Carol Williams

Alderleaf Mountain Mahogany, Silverleaf, Mountain Mahogany

CEMO2 (Cercocarpus montanus)

Family: Rosaceae (Roses)
Size: 78 - 156 in (198 - 396 cm)
Growth: shrub, tree; perennial
Blooms: Apr 15 - May 19

Flower: simple; red and yellow; non-showy; trumpet-shaped
Leaf: dicot; leaves almost evergreen in nature; dark on top and fuzzy on the bottom
Fruit: feathery, silvery-white fruits

Status: native; common
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- rocky hillsides, cliffs, open woods, mesas

The plant fixes nitrogen and is good for revegetation and erosion control. The foliage is a favorite of deer. In the wild, the plant generally remains as a shrub and does not obtain a tree-like form.

Info    Photos   Distribution   Tree Guide
Dakota Mock Vervain

Photo: Rebecca Shankland

Dakota Mock Vervain

Photo: Jerry Oldenettel

Dakota Mock Vervain, Dakota Verbena, Prairie Verbena

GLBI2 (Glandularia bipinnatifida)

Family: Verbenaceae (Verbenas)
Size: 9 - 12 in (23 - 30 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, perennial
Blooms: Mar 10 - Jun 01 and Sep 15 - Oct 15
Flower: simple; pink to purple; grow in rounded clusters
Leaf: dicot; finely dissected, into segments; opposite arrangement
Fruit: 4 nutlets enclosed in a calyx

Status: native; locally common
Habitat: pinyon-juniper --- semi-desert, open areas
Typical location: Red Dot Trail, White Rock Canyon

There plants can often can be seen along the trail or in old lava flows. The leaves tend to lean outward from the center as the plant grows and the stems are reddish.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Davis Mountain Mock Vervain

Photo: annagypsy

Davis Mountain Mock Vervain

Photo: Craig Martin

Davis Mountain Mock Vervain, Desert Verbena, Wright's Verbena

GLWR (Glandularia wrightii)

Family: Verbenaceae (Verbena)
Size: 6 - 12 in (15 - 30 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; annual, perennial
Blooms: Mar 01 - Sep 30

Flower: simple; light to dark pink; narrow tube that opens abruptly into 5 notched lobes with 2 close together
Leaf: dicot; deeply lobed leaves at opposite intervals
Fruit: acorn-shaped seed

Status: native; common
Habitat: montane, mountain meadow --- semi-desert, foothills, woodlands
Typical location: Red Dot Trail

Plant has greenish-red stems that are covered in short hairs and square in cross-section. Stems are erect, though may lean at an angle when flowering. Flowers form round clusters.

Info    Photos   Distribution   
Hookedspur Violet

Photo: Krissa Klein

Hookedspur Violet

Photo: Craig Martin

Hookedspur Violet, Blue Violet, Hook Violet; Dog Violet

VIAD (Viola adunca)

Family: Violaceae (Violets)
Size: up to 12 in (30 cm)
Growth: forb/herb; perennial
Blooms: Apr 05 - Jul 12

Flower: simple; blue to purple; single flowers growing on long, thin stems; 5 petals; top 2 may have spurs
Leaf: dicot; heart-shaped; wavy margins
Fruit: hanging ovoid capsule with dark brown seeds

Status: native; common
Habitat: mixed conifer --- woodlands, montane, subalpine, alpine

Scores of flowering plants commonly cover large areas. Often hidden among taller grasses and plants.

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