Naturalist’s Choice

Way back in 2011, these PEEC summer campers learned how to use binoculars while out in the field! Binoculars are one of the tools that naturalists use to make close observations of nature. (Photo by Michele Altherr)

We have reached the end of our Take It Outside summer challenge! By now, we hope you have found some favorite nature topics or favorite activities to do outside. This week, we challenge you to explore one of your favorite topics in more depth, revisit something you tried earlier to see how it has changed with the season, or pick a new topic you’ve been curious about!

We’re also kicking off a new blog series focusing on New Mexico Naturalists. Below, read our profile of our first New Mexico Naturalist, Mariana Rivera Freeman.

Summer Nature Challenge – Due September 1!:

You can earn this binoculars sticker by completing our Naturalist’s Choice challenge!

Finish your summer nature challenge sheet by September 1 to get your stickers! We plan to offer a curbside sticker pickup and passport prize pickup the weekend of September 4 – 6. Keep your eye on our events page for more details soon. You can also mail your completed challenge form to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544, or contact us to arrange a pickup at another time.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email us your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Blog Post & Upcoming Event:

We interviewed PEEC’s Field Science Specialist, Mariana Rivera Freeman, on today’s inaugural New Mexico Naturalist profile. Find out what brought Mariana to nature, and learn about some of her hopes and concerns for us and the place we call home. Come back next month to meet another New Mexico Naturalist!

Join Mariana to hear her discuss her field experiences studying Gunnison’s prairie dogs at Valles Caldera National Preserve this Tuesday, August 4 at 7 PM. Find out more and register for the talk here.

Outdoor Challenges:

This week, you choose the challenges! Here are some of our favorite challenges from the past 20 weeks, along with something new.

Tell us about your favorite outdoor topic or activity! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org

 

Challenge #1 – Go Birdwatching

Way back on the very first day of the pandemic closure (seems like 100 years ago!) we challenged you to find as many of the 20 most common birds of Los Alamos as you could. Then, people noticed lots of Spotted Towhees and Dark-eyed Juncos, and nary a hummingbird. That was in March. Try it again in early August, and notice how the birds have changed with the seasons.

 

Challenge #2 – Fish for Aquatic Creatures

Looking for aquatic creatures is a great way to explore the less-noticed critters that live around you!

In March, most of our surface water came from snowmelt. Then we went through a long dry period, and now we can see water in our canyon bottoms again, due to our monsoon rains. Find a stream or other body of water, and look for aquatic creatures! One of the best ways to find aquatic macroinvertebrates is to pick up rocks, hold them upside down, and look for anything that wiggles. Bring a light-colored tub or container, fill it halfway with water, and carefully transfer your critters to the container to see them better. Try to identify some of your finds using this easy-to-use key.

This time of year, in addition to macroinvertebrates, we can sometimes find vertebrates like tadpoles and adult frogs in still water. See if you can find any of these! Always return your creatures to the wild after you have looked at them.

 

Challenge #3 – Get a New Perspective

So you think you know your favorite spot? Get a new perspective on it by trying a micro-hike: explore it from the eyes of an ant. Use a piece of string to outline an area of about a square foot or so, and notice everything you can about that microworld. What textures, smells, sights, or even sounds do you notice? What would it be like to wander around as a tiny inhabitant of this spot?

 

Want to Learn More?

  • Check out the National Phenology Network, which tracks data about seasonal changes around the United States and how these are shifting with global climate change. You can participate as a citizen scientist through their Nature’s Notebook program.
  • Take your observations to the next level and contribute to citizen science! Check out our citizen science activities from back in June for some ideas.
  • Check out this YouTube video for some inspiration on challenge #3. It was filmed with a GoPro to capture life from an ant’s perspective! We also like this photo, which was a part of Smithsonian Magazine’s photo contest, of a tree from an ant’s point of view! Can you capture any photos or videos from a different point of view? If so, we’d love to see them!

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.

Ecology

Northern Pygmy Owls interact with our ecosystem in a variety of ways! They eat rodents, insects, reptiles, and other birds. This owl nests in holes in trees, but they never dig their own cavities. Instead, they rely on cavities formed by rot or woodpeckers! (Photo by Mouser Williams)

Did you know that the word ecology comes from the Greek roots “oikos,” or house, and “-logia” or study? So, you can think of it as the study of home, or how organisms relate to their environments. 

This week on Take It Outside, we are exploring some of the particular ways organisms in Northern New Mexico relate to our local environment.

Summer Nature Challenge:

You’ll earn this Abert’s squirrel sticker by participating in Ecology Week!

Participate in our Summer Nature Challenge! Every week, participants who complete the challenge can earn a sticker. If you finish all nine weeks, you’ll earn a bonus sticker! Find our archive containing all of our past Take It Outside activities here.

Download the challenge sheet here to print out and complete at home. At the end of the challenge, you can either bring it to the nature center or mail it to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Blog Post:

In this week’s blog post, learn bats have impacted life as we know it. Check it out here!

Outdoor Challenges:

We’re posting three outdoor challenges today that you can enjoy throughout the week!

Tell us about your experiences with one, two, or all three of them! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

We explored bats at a Halloween Nature Playtime in 2018. Some of our participants even dressed the part! (Photo by Rachel Landman)

 

Challenge #1 – Look for Bats!

There are at least a dozen species of bats in Northern New Mexico. Try to spot some of them! Bats are active at dusk and dawn, and sometimes throughout the night. They like to eat bugs and prefer areas with open skies.

Some places to look include over bodies of water, like at Ashley Pond in Los Alamos, or rivers, lakes, and water treatment ponds. Or, try looking near parking lots where the lights attract bugs. Let us know where you saw a bat!

 

Challenge #2 – Ecosystem Mapping

This challenge is based on an activity designed by the Santa Fe Watershed Association. An ecosystem is composed of the living and nonliving things in a place, and all the relationships between them. Take a piece of paper outside, and start writing down or drawing all the living and nonliving things you notice. Examples are specific animals, plants, sun, water, air, and much more. 

Now, think of the ways they are related. For example, grass needs the sun for photosynthesis. Draw a line between sun and grass to represent this relationship. Keep thinking of relationships and drawing lines. How many can you think of? How connected is your ecosystem? Share your results with us on your summer challenge sheet or by using the form below!

 

Challenge #3 – Ecological Relationships

New Mexico’s state insect, the tarantula hawk wasp, has a fascinating relationship with tarantulas! (Photo by Mike Lewinski)

Try to spot some of our region’s iconic ecological relationships:

  • Abert’s squirrels and ponderosa pines. Look for these tufted-eared squirrels among the ponderosa pines, whose seeds and sap they eat. In addition, the squirrels eat the fruiting bodies and spread the spores of mycorrhizal fungi, which grow in a symbiotic relationship with the ponderosas!
  • Tarantula hawk wasps and … tarantulas. The state insect of New Mexico is a large wasp that captures and paralyzes tarantulas with its venomous (and reportedly extremely painful) sting. It lays a single egg inside the arachnid, and when the larva hatches, it eats the still-living tarantula from the inside out. Look for a heavy-looking wasp, up to 2 inches long, with a dark body and orange wings. Don’t worry, these wasps are not aggressive toward humans. See a quick video of a tarantula hawk paralyzing a tarantula here.
  • Milkweed and monarch butterflies. Monarchs breed and migrate through New Mexico, and you can see them here in late summer. The monarch is a specialist on milkweed plants, which means the female monarch lays eggs only on milkweed plants, and these plants sustain the hungry larvae until they are ready to metamorphose into adults. As they feed on the milkweed, the larvae build up toxins called cardenolides that help protect the butterflies from predation. There are several species of milkweed native to New Mexico. If you find milkweed, look for adult monarchs, eggs, larvae, or chrysalises, but be sure not to disturb these animals whose populations have declined precipitously in the last few decades due to habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change. You can visit PEEC’s new native milkweed garden behind the fence on the west side of the nature center.

 

Want to Learn More?

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.

Weather & Climate

July monsoon clouds seen from Deer Trap Mesa in Los Alamos. (Photo by Craig Martin)

This week on Take It Outside, we are exploring weather and climate. Explore monsoon season, build a weather station, play in the rain, and more!

Summer Nature Challenge:

You’ll earn this weather sticker by participating in Weather & Climate Week!

Participate in our Summer Nature Challenge! Every week, participants who complete the challenge can earn a sticker. If you finish all nine weeks, you’ll earn a bonus sticker! Find our archive containing all of our past Take It Outside activities here.

Download the challenge sheet here to print out and complete at home. At the end of the challenge, you can either bring it to the nature center or mail it to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Blog Post:

In this week’s blog post, PEEC volunteer Jean Dewart explores the science behind the monsoon season in Northern New Mexico and gives an update on outlooks for the 2020 season. Read it here.

Outdoor Challenges:

We’re posting three outdoor challenges today that you can enjoy throughout the week!

Tell us about your experiences with one, two, or all three of them! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Challenge #1 – Play in the Rain!

One of the best things about rain is to get outside and splash in it. Smell the petrichor, feel the cool drops on your skin, take off your shoes, dance, sink your fingers into the mud, and float leaves and sticks in rivulets. Be aware of traffic, lightning (stay inside if you hear thunder), and flash flooding (avoid canyons when rain is falling in the watershed).

 

PEEC volunteers Dave North and Akkana Peck installing the weather station at the Los Alamos Nature Center. (Photo by Rachel Landman)

Challenge #2 – Build a Weather Station:

There are good reasons to have your own weather station. For one thing, weather can be extremely localized. Comparing rain and other measurements with neighbors only a few blocks away can give very different results. Knowing the nearby air temperature also gives you a better idea of when to open and close windows, turn on fans, and how to employ other low-cost and energy-efficient alternatives to using heat or air conditioning.

You can craft a simple weather station with household materials using this guide from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). With it you can craft tools to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, rainfall, and more at your house! 

This week, we challenge you to build at least one of these instruments and take a weather-related measurement at your house. Let us know what you record!

Did you know that we have our own weather station at the Los Alamos Nature Center? Check out its readings on Weather Underground!

Thanks to PEEC volunteer Dave North for sharing some weather station tips for this challenge!

 

Exploring the outdoors after a rain can be a great time to observe wildlife! This summer camper discovered a worm in August 2019! (Photo by Denise Matthews)

Challenge #3 – Rain and the Ecosystem:

Water is life! Observe how wildlife and plants behave after rain. Look for evidence of the following:

  • Worms emerging from the ground
  • Insect larvae hatching in stagnant water
  • Birds and other wildlife drinking from and bathing in puddles
  • Plant leaves changing from a wilted to perky appearance
  • Seeds germinating in damp soil
  • Lawns and natural areas greening over several days

 

Want to Learn More?

  • Did you know that you can get a nearly real-time professional weather readout from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Weather Machine. Check out this page to explore the weather in Los Alamos County.
  • If you were inspired by this week’s outdoor challenge, you can purchase a weather station to set up at home for more accurate readings. According to Dave North, there’s no real need to spend top dollar. The accuracy difference — if any — between the most expensive amateur units and cheaper units is not really significant. Be sure to calibrate your machine if you decide to get one! This is an important step to get accurate readings. Learn more about personal weather stations here.
  • Check out NASA’s Climate Kids page for interactive learning about our climate.

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.

Plants

A bee pays a visit to a penstemon palmeri at the Los Alamos Nature Center. (Photo by Larry Deaven)

This week on Take It Outside, visit a community garden in Abiquiú on our blog, and then check out the plants growing in your neighborhood.

Summer Nature Challenge:

Participate in our Summer Nature Challenge! Every week, participants who complete the challenge can earn a sticker. If you finish all nine weeks, you’ll earn a bonus sticker! Find our archive containing all of our past Take It Outside activities here.

Download the challenge sheet here to print out and complete at home. At the end of the challenge, you can either bring it to the nature center or mail it to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

Blog Post:

In this week’s blog post, PEEC’s Education Programs Director Siobhan Niklasson recounts her recent visit to the Northern Youth Project Garden in Abiquiú. Read her blog post here.

Outdoor Challenges:

We’re posting three outdoor challenges today that you can enjoy throughout the week!

Tell us about your experiences with one, two, or all three of them! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Challenge #1 – Sensory Exploration:

Visit a garden or wild area with plants. Use your senses to explore the plants. Can you find something:

  • Fuzzy
  • Waxy
  • Cool
  • Smooth
  • Red
  • Yellow
  • Buzzing
  • Sweet-smelling
  • Herby-smelling

If you like, choose some of the colors and textures you noticed and use those inspirations to make art!

 

Challenge #2 – Eat Locally:

Pilar and friends make popsicles from Yerba Buena in this video from Tewa Women United.

Pick up something in season from a farmers’ market, a CSA, or another source for local produce. Or, harvest something for your own garden or forage for berries, fruits, and herbs locally (make sure you know what you are picking before eating anything you find in the wild). 

Here’s an idea for a cool, local treat: In this video from Tewa Women United, watch as Pilar and her nephews make popsicles from Yerba Buena, or spearmint, and lavender from their garden. The video is part of a series called Plant Adventures that explores New Mexico plants and their traditional culinary and medicinal uses.

Let us know what you tasted! Or share your favorite recipe from your garden or from locally-grown, seasonal produce.

Challenge #3 – Plants & the Food Web:

A male Rufous Hummingbird gets ready to visit a flower in White Rock. These hummingbirds have recently started to make their annual stops in Los Alamos County! (Photo by Bob Walker)

In a process called photosynthesis, plants use energy from the sun to combine carbon dioxide and water to make sugar. This process changes some of the sun’s energy into a form that animals and other organisms can use when they eat the plants. Go outside and look for evidence of animals and fungi getting energy from plants:

  • Hummingbirds and insects gathering nectar from flowers
  • Birds eating seeds and fruits
  • Caterpillars, ants, and other invertebrates eating leaves
  • Herbivores, such as deer and rabbits, munching on green plants
  • Decomposers, like worms, roly polies, and fungi, breaking down decaying plants and trees

 

Want to Learn More?

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.

Nature Art

Liv Niklasson created this piece of land art in early April and it was still intact in mid-May when she checked up on it! What art can you make with the natural materials around you? (Photo by Siobhan Niklasson)

This week on Take It Outside, learn how local artists have been inspired by the natural world around them, and spend some time making nature art yourself.

This week, we’re also celebrating Los Alamos ScienceFest virtually! See what PEEC has in store for this virtual festival.

Summer Nature Challenge:

Participate in our Summer Nature Challenge! Every week, participants who complete the challenge can earn a sticker. If you finish all nine weeks, you’ll earn a bonus sticker! Find our archive containing all of our past Take It Outside activities here.

Download the challenge sheet here to print out and complete at home. At the end of the challenge, you can either bring it to the nature center or mail it to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

Blog Post:

Patricia Galagan reflects on photographing our forests with her husband Philip Metcalf in the aftermath of the Las Conchas fire. Their book, Fire Ghosts, was published in late 2019 and features their photography portfolios from this project. Learn more about what they learned from this process in this week’s blog post.

Outdoor Challenges:

We’re posting three outdoor challenges today that you can enjoy throughout the week!

Tell us about your experiences with one, two, or all three of them! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

Challenge #1 – Land Art:

Go outside and spend some time getting a feel for the area, then gather natural materials that speak to you. Use them to create land art, ideally using the materials in the area where you found them. If you like, take a picture of your artwork, and share it with us! Leave the art for others to discover, and to break down naturally over time.

See some additional tips here.

 

Challenge #2 – Wildlife Photography:

A male Calliope Hummingbird photographed at a hummingbird feeder. They are the smallest birds in the United States! (Photo by Aditya Viswanathan)

This challenge is from Aditya Viswanathan, a rising sixth-grader from Los Alamos and wildlife photographer.

July is a great time to learn wildlife photography as the hummingbirds are coming to Los Alamos in large quantities. Here are a few activities that you can try to get started or fine-tune your skills. If you have a hummingbird feeder, you can wait for a while and see which hummingbirds come and try to photograph them. Hummingbirds like to visit feeders and you’re more likely to see them at one rather than on a flower. If you don’t have a feeder, try making a simple one from recycled materials! Make sure to get the camera crosshairs on the hummingbird, or else the photo will be blurry. Phones work okay, but cameras (especially ones with zoom lenses) are better if you have one. It will take a bit of practice and patience, but if you stick with it, you should have some very good photos.

If you are ready for a bigger challenge, research which flowers different hummingbirds like. Hint: hummingbirds like red, tubular flowers. If you don’t have any of them, other flowers work too. Wait at a flower of your choice for about half an hour and see if any hummingbirds come. Photographing them at a flower will create a more natural-looking picture. Butterflies and bees may come too, which are also good photo targets.

Another advanced challenge that you can do is try to freeze a hummingbird’s wing while in flight. To do this, adjust the shutter speed in the menus. I recommend 1/1000 seconds for the shutter speed. Please note that some cameras don’t have this feature. I hope you find these activities fun and helpful. Send a picture you snap to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or post it on social media and tag @peecnature!

Challenge #3 – Nature Sketching:

Practice nature sketching this week by drawing the details of different leaves! (Photo by Terry Foxx)

This challenge comes from Teralene Foxx, co-author and illustrator of Plants of the Jemez Mountains, which can be ordered from PEEC’s online shop.

Sketching is a good way of learning and remembering the different shapes and sizes you observe in nature. Wander around your backyard or go on a hike and collect five leaves from five different plants (make sure to stay away from shiny, 3-leaved poison ivy!). Note what plant the leaf comes from: a flower, a shrub, or a tree. Are the leaves positioned opposite each other or do they alternate along the stem? Write down what you see. Look at the top of the leaf and the underside and see any differences.

With a paper and pencil, lay the leaf on the paper and trace around the outside of the leaf. Now you have the outside dimensions of the leaf. Observe the leaf carefully and draw anything you see about the leaf and put the detail into your drawing (e.g. the edge of the leaf, the veins, the color, hairs, texture). Ask yourself: Is the top of the leaf the same color as the bottom of the leaf? Record this information. If you have colored pencils or crayons, you might want to color the leaf. If you have a ruler, you might want to measure the different sizes of leaves and make a note. 

After you practice shapes and sizes of leaves, try drawing a leaf without tracing the outside of the leaf. You will be amazed at the different shapes and sizes of leaves!

 

Want to Learn More?

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.

Animals

Mule deer are a common large mammal here in Northern New Mexico. These deer are named for their large, donkey-like ears! (Photo by Mouser Williams)

This week on Take It Outside, explore the world of our local animals. In past Take It Outside posts, we’ve explored reptiles and amphibians, mammals, birds, and insects. Find information and activities about these topics and more on our archive page. This week, we’re exploring aquatic animals, animal signs, and animal behavior in our outdoor challenges. Plus, take a special look at New Mexico’s fish in this week’s blog post!

Summer Nature Challenge:

Participate in our Summer Nature Challenge! Every week, participants who complete the challenge can earn a sticker. If you finish all nine weeks, you’ll earn a bonus sticker! Find our archive containing all of our past Take It Outside activities here.

Download the challenge sheet here to print out and complete at home. At the end of the challenge, you can either bring it to the nature center or mail it to us at 2600 Canyon Rd, Los Alamos, NM 87544.

If you don’t have a printer or prefer to work online, you can tell us about your experiences in the Google Form below or email your stories and pictures to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

Blog Post:

Do you like to fish? Have you ever wondered how native and introduced fish in our ecosystem differ? Casey Harthorn of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish discusses fish in New Mexico, with a special look at our state’s native and introduced trout species. Read his blog post here.

Outdoor Challenges:

We’re posting three outdoor challenges today that you can enjoy throughout the week!

Tell us about your experiences with one, two, or all three of them! You can do this in the Google Form below, by writing or drawing about them on our summer challenge sheet, or by sending an email to takeitoutside@peecnature.org.

 

PEEC campers were able to find frog eggs, tadpoles, and adult frogs in this pool in Acid Canyon. (Photo by Siobhan Niklasson)

Challenge #1 – Aquatic Animals:

Northern New Mexico doesn’t have a lot of water, but aquatic animals are able to find and take advantage of even very small bodies of water to grow and reproduce.

Seek out water in your area, like rivers, lakes or reservoirs, stock ponds, springs, or pools in canyon bottoms, and look for signs of aquatic animals. Here are some things to look for:

  • Adults and larvae of aquatic invertebrates (insects and other small critters)
  • Frog or salamander eggs, tadpoles or nymphs, and adults
  • Fish
  • Birds, reptiles, and mammals visiting water sources

 

Challenge #2 – Animal Scat:

Scat can tell us who was in an area and also what they ate. Go on a hike and look for scat! How many of these can you find? Based on what you find, what types of food are animals eating in your area?

  • Scat containing berries or fruit
  • Scat containing grass or other plants
  • Scat containing fur or bones
  • Scat containing insect parts

Remember that all scat contains bacteria, so don’t touch it with your fingers (use a stick!) and wash your hands when you get home. Stay away from dog poop, which is often very uniform in texture and lacks recognizable food items, since most domestic dogs eat processed dog food. Remember to always clean up your own dog’s poop when out on the trail!

Test your knowledge of animal scat in this poop quiz, too!

Challenge #3 – Animal Behavior:

This squirrel was photographed with a mouth full of nesting materials! (Photo by Mouser Williams)

It’s fascinating to watch animals go about their daily lives. Go outside and find an animal: a bird, insect or other invertebrate, mammal, reptile, amphibian, or fish. Be as still as you can to let it get used to you, and watch what it does. Can you see how it does any of the following things?

  • Gathering food and eating
  • Moving around
  • Regulating its temperature
  • Feeding and caring for young
  • Nesting
  • Taking shelter
  • Interacting with others of the same or another species
  • Communicating with others
  • Defending itself or its young
  • Playing

If you have a nature journal, record some of your observations. Let us know what you notice!

 

Want to Learn More?

Share Your Experience:

Tell us about your outdoor experiences! We’d love to see your photos, too. Please send them to takeitoutside@peecnature.org or share them on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #peectakeitoutside. If you’d like this to count for the Summer Nature Challenge, be sure to include your name and email address.